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  1. What is Project Renaissance?

  2. Who is Win Wenger?

  3. What is "Creative Problem-Solving" and why is it important?

  4. What is "Accelerated Learning"? Who can use it?

  5. What is "Image-Streaming"? Does it really work?

  6. What if I don't get images?

  7. Is it ok to explain and/or analyze what I am seeing in my image stream?

  8. What advice do you have for people new to Image-Streaming? For students?

  9. Why is describing out loud, to a person or a tape recorder, such an important part of the Image-Streaming process?

  10. I am a "visualizer," but I am having a hard time describing what I see. Any suggestions?


  11. Is Image-Streaming like meditation?

  12. My imagery seems to transform into scary images, awful happenings, monsters, etc. ... with the result that I don't want to do Image-Streaming for fear of seeing horrible things again. How do I deal with this?

  13. If I can't relax at all, and I'm training Image-Streaming, will my intelligence still increase?

  14. Does Image-Streaming increase mathematical skills?

  15. Can Image-Streaming, or any other method you advocate, help foreign language learners? Would positive effects on verbal skills be greater for the native language than the foreign language?

  16. When I Image-Stream, I get caught up in the (developing) "storyline." The crux of your technique is in exercising all the senses using our own feedback by describing something, correct?

  17. Isn't just describing the details of an image mentally, rather than aloud, enough? I was under the impression that just thinking about an activity exercised most of the circuits in the brain associated with actually doing the activity.

  18. Is it possible to image-stream 7 hours a day, if I tried my hardest and I had the time? I just want to play with the possibilities.

  19. Sometimes my images are cartoon images. Should I describe them, too? Is it as effective as "normal" Image-Streaming?

  20. Should I do my daily Image-Streaming in bulk or can I split it into many sessions?


  21. In my streams there are often animals. Is it OK to describe the same animals over and over if that is what I am seeing?

  22. Can I freenote audiotapes and books, or does it have to be a lecture?

  23. I have been having some trouble isolating valuable images. They have been of the day-dreaming, garbage variety and of no discernible use. Does this effect fade with practice?

  24. When I am not able to receive complete images, I fill them in from my own imagination, creating a picture of a tree, a path, etc... I feel that this is forcing the images. Is this something that I should not be doing?

  25. How does Image-Streaming fit with the practice of meditation, in which you avoid images or thoughts and focus solely on breathing?

  26. Hyperzine A (a Chinese herb) increases growth of dendrites. Does it increase the intelligence-boosting ability of Image-Streaming?

  27. I heard some exercises could be replaced with various other procedures, including breathing techniques. What are they?

  28. I read that cutting off the supply of oxygen to your brain for 3 minutes or longer results in neuron death — brain damage. So wouldn't holding your breath for such a long period of time be harmful?

  29. I'm a student. Is there anything I can do to increase my IQ in 6 weeks? I have three hours' free time each day that Iím willing to spend on an intelligence-raising procedure.

  30. Are the results from Image -Streaming permanent? You say the human brain has an IQ over 300. If this is true, what barriers prevent us from reaching that?


  31. In the Reinert studies of Southwest State University physics students, why was the Kolb inventory used instead of a standardized test like SAT, GRE, Stanford-Binet IQ, or some other IQ test?




Q001.   What is Project Renaissance?

Project Renaissance is a non-profit educational organization based in Maryland, U.S.A. Its core mission is to enable as many people as possible to become more than a match for the situations, opportunities, problems or difficulties they find around them, and to enjoy a richer quality of life and experience. For a full background, please see "What is Project Renaissance?" and read its Core Message.

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Q002.   Who is Win Wenger?

Win Wenger, Ph.D., is a pioneer in the fields of creativity and creative method, accelerated learning, brain and mind development, and political economy. He is the founder of Project Renaissance and its premier trainer. For more background, please see "Who is Win Wenger?"

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Q003.   What is "Creative Problem-Solving" and why is it important?

"Creative Problem-Solving" (CPS) refers to creatively and ingeniously solving problems of all kinds. The world-wide creativity movement began around 1950, when Alex Osborn overthrew the established belief that one is simply born creative or born uncreative and not subject to change.

The Osborn-Parnes CPS Method, and Synectics, demonstrated that even very "uncreative" people could be retrained to be highly creative and effective problem-solvers. Osborn's demonstration of "deliberate creativity" has been widely received in results-oriented business and industry and has made wide differences in many individuals' careers and personal lives.

It has made only spotty progress in schools, government and statescraft. The high point in statescraft thus far was the use of Osborn-Parnes CPS Method to mediate a peaceful outcome to the apartheid crisis in the Union of South Africa. With problems piling up across the world much faster than they are getting solved, we in Project Renaissance feel there to be some urgency to getting more people — and more of the decision-makers — equipped with effective methods for solving problems.

Many proponents of various CPS methods feel theirs is the answer to everyone's problems. However, among the varieties of problems, some solve more easily by one approach than by another, and true professional consultants or CPS professionals should have many various methods in their toolkit, each as a back-up to the others.

If you have a good method for solving problems, one of its best uses is on — the problem of how to create a better method for solving problems. Pursuing this principle over three decades, Project Renaissance has created literally hundreds of remarkably effective CPS methods and creativity-evoking techniques — which is why Project Renaissance is the source for a majority of the various CPS techniques now in professional use around the world.

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Q004.   What is "Accelerated Learning"? Who can use it?

"Accelerated Learning" (AL) refers to any method or set of methods which enables one to learn more, faster and deeper and with greater ease. Some forms of AL focus on rapid and long-lasting memorization of content such as foreign languages. That is the main strength of Suggestopedia, developed by Dr. Georgi Lozanov in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Other forms work with preferred cognitive styles or preferred learning styles among learners, matching content to those various styles to facilitate learning. Howard Gardner's "seven intelligences" is an example of such an approach. Cooperative Team Learning in its various forms also represents an approach which considerably facilitates learning.

All the above are methods for putting information in, and most of them are concerned with how rapidly and for how long one may take ininformation content.

Project Renaissance, in contrast, is focused mainly on understanding rather than memorization. Project Renaissance focuses on transfer of knowledge, understanding and skills from initial learning context to other contexts. Project Renaissance is also concerned mainly with how to retrieve previously learned information and skills and understandings. We've found various forms of Socratic Method especially useful at pulling up into useful consciousness such a priori resources. It matters little how you put information in if you have a strong enough system for retrieving it.

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Q005.   What is "Image-Streaming"? Does it really work?

Eighty to ninety percent of the brain, by volume, associates by sensory imagery. Less than two percent of the brain associates in words and word concepts, though that is where most of our conscious thinking and perceiving is. Most of our intelligence and nearly all our creativity are found in the unconscious part of our brain which associates in sensory images. Working in the language of that part of our brain wherein resides the vast majority of our intelligence, Image-Streaming accesses resources greater and more extensive than most of us are used to using in Western culture.

The practice of Image-Streaming is to "look inside," allowing ourselves to become conscious of whatever imagery happens to be playing in "the back of our mind" — or "in the Mind's Eye," and to involve all the senses, not just vision.

To be a true Image-Stream, the visual and sensory content must be "spontaneous" — i.e., coming from elsewhere in your brain than where you consciously make your choices and decisions. It must not be a made-up story as in most daydreams; its contents should be free from your conscious direction in the sense that you decide to see a tree and then visualize a tree. Your conscious direction can be engaged in the very general regard that you can think of a question and then let your greater, sensory mind answer that question with unanticipated images. The more surprising those images, the more likely that you have engaged those further, beyond-conscious regions of the brain and mind which you are seeking to consult.

For a true Image-Stream, you also need to be describing those images aloud to a listener while you are experiencing and examining them. A listener will elicit from you the kinds of description which will most strongly, detailedly and effectively develop your conscious perception of your imagery. See Image-Streaming for detailed instructions.

Besides its entertainment value, besides aesthetics (much of the contents of this sensory imagery are most extraordinarily beautiful), and besides its practical value in answering questions, solving problems and bringing key insights into focus in education, there is some indication that Image-Streaming also integrates the brain and results in permanent gains in both meaningful intelligence and "I.Q."

Formal studies are very much sought to more definitively determine this issue. Also needed are some high-speed, high-resolution scans of the brain during Image-Streaming, which could tell us very much about information-processing in the human brain.

With present methods of Image-Streaming, and with numerous back-up procedures to make sure that everyone is able to consciously perceive their own ongoing imagery, better than 99% of those who follow the printed instructions, or who are trained, succeed in Image-Streaming. This near-universality can be expected, given that sensory imagery association comprises the majority of the brains of every living human being. It speaks to a major practical and personal development tool's being within the ready grasp of us all.

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Q006.   What if I don't get images?

Don't assume that the images will be as vivid as those experienced while dreaming. The image faculties that you use in daydreaming or simply imagining, for example, what your house looks like, are all you need to practice Image-Streaming. Your visualization abilities will get much sharper with practice. There are over 20 "Back-Up Procedures" to get your imagery started.

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Q007.   Is it ok to explain and/or analyze what I am seeing in my image stream?

It's usually best to describe what you sense, as you sense it. Explain or elaborate after the Image Stream is done. In problem-solving, sometimes an obvious point hits in the middle, and since the purpose was the insight, go ahead and voice it. But it's almost always better to stay in the experience until it resolves itself, because engaging the left brain removes you from the right-brain sensory associations that hold what you seek.

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Q008.   What advice do you have for people new to Image-Streaming? For students?

First, especially when starting, use a live partner if possible. A live receiver at close range coaxes your creative process far better than a tape recorder, which only documents. Second, set and follow a firm schedule. Your inner consciousness will prepare for the next session as it prepares you for your next regular meal, or daily exercise. Third, expect each session uniquely to show you very special things once you settle into the process. Expect to go even further into the effects than before. Keep expecting each new session to be special — and it will be.

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Q009.   Why is describing out loud, to a person or a tape recorder, such an important part of the Image-Streaming process?

Having the listener, live or potential, changes what you say and how you say it — and changes how you hear what you are saying. It is the circuit, between what you describe and the feedback from your describing, that shapes and develops your experience of your own subtler perceptions. For more on drawing out deeper awarenesses, please see Feeding the Loop and The Socratic Continuum.

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Q010.   I am a "visualizer," but I am having a hard time describing what I see. Any suggestions?

1)  You might make a game or exercise of describing other things around you when you are not Image-Streaming. One person I know got past his hurdle by describing into a tape recorder what he was seeing as he drove down the street or highway. Get comfortable with describing, then transfer your developed descriptive ability to Image-Streaming.

2)  Try some of the twenty-plus back-up procedures free online.

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Q011.   Is Image-Streaming like meditation?

Among many forms of meditation, Image-Streaming is one, as is intensely listening to music or any other deliberately maintenance of a special mental, physical, emotional or spiritual state. Some may be more useful than others, depending on your moment and purpose.

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Q012.   My imagery seems to transform into scary images, awful happenings, monsters, etc. ... with the result that I don't want to do Image-Streaming for fear of seeing horrible things again. How do I deal with this?

I recommend this full drill:
  1. Do 5-15 minute segments of Noise-Removal Breathing (NRB) until you have accumulated a few hours of combined experience.

  2. Noise-removal breathe while putting your full attention on those frightening experiences and images. Allow yourself to feel all your fear. Expose those feelings to the ongoing NRB, allowing them to be "swept up and cleanly away" out of your body in those bright showers of sparks turning into good clean life energy...."

  3. If need be, blowtorch-breathe on the worst fear-figures and see what you can burn up with those extra-hot showers of sparks.

  4. When the fear is used up, satisfaction-breathe on the range and depth of experiences over which you now have control.

  5. Next time a fear-figure shows up, in the freedom of your own mind, NRB "up and away" whatever had made it hurt.... — this almost always turns into a most beautiful and illuminating experience.
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Q013.   If I can't relax at all, and I'm training Image-Streaming, will my intelligence still increase?

So long as you get undirected images and relate them to an audience in sensory detail, you will get intelligence improvement. To get relaxation, I recommend Calm-Breathing Patterns.

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Q014.   Does Image-Streaming increase mathematical skills?

It should enhance all skills. You might get a little more by intending your practicing it to generate more math skills for you. You might also try Borrowed Genius and Toolbuilder.

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Q015.   Can Image-Streaming, or any other method you advocate, help foreign language learners? Would positive effects on verbal skills be greater for the native language than the foreign language?

I think the benefits are greater in one's own primary language. However, doing it in a second language would be a fast track to further developing that language. However, one would have to be reasonably fluent in that second language to be able to truly Image-Stream and articulate the experience. Otherwise one would be in the left brain translating much of the time, with very little access to the sensory and perceptive functions that provide the images.

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Q016.   When I Image-Stream, I get caught up in the (developing) "storyline," or even trying to be poetic. The crux of your technique is in exercising all the senses using our own feedback by describing something, correct?

Description is indeed the key. Interesting as story lines are — and sometimes these also are productive of insights — a key part of growth is to be able to give more attention to your actual perceptions as compared to your expectations and to your perceptual and conceptual shortcuts.

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Q017.   Isn't just describing the details of an image mentally, rather than aloud, enough? I was under the impression that just thinking about an activity exercised most of the circuits in the brain associated with actually doing the activity.

Please examine the major article, Feeding the Loop, then consider:   With a real or prospective listener, you speak differently than when no one else is around — and you hear yourself differently as well. Having a listener changes both the output and input sides of the feedback loop whereby our subtlest awarenesses get best developed.

A second reason is that, for bio-evolutionary reasons, our sensory feedback from external senses is more rapid and immediate than is our sensory feedback from internal senses. Coordinating what we express externally — if we can get the activities of subtler-perceiving, further-perceiving, reaches of the brain expressed externally — forces a more immediate relationship to form between those regions of the brain and our verbally based everyday consciousness. Only 2% of your brain associates in words; most of your brain associates in sensory images. Where, then, is most of your intelligence to be found?

A third reason is expressed in Windtunnel and The Socratic Continuum:   the need to get past the fluff and stock responses we have for everything, to the fresh and subtler awarenesses where the payoffs are to be found.

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Q018.   Is it possible to image-stream 7 hours a day, if I tried my hardest and I had the time? I just want to play with the possibilities.

Seven hours a day for more than one day is not a very good idea unless you are willing to physically exercise strenuously an equal 7 hours/day to keep your system in balance. You should get in as much physical exercise as you spend time Image-Streaming or any other form of deep-state or meditative activity.

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Q019.   Sometimes my images are cartoon images. Should I describe them, too? Is it as effective as "normal" Image-Streaming?

Yes. The very fact of putting these deeper realities into words, even concrete words, is an abstracting process. Your mind may be commenting on that, since cartoons are an abstracting process, getting to essential points from what would otherwise be a much more complex and involved picture.

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Q020.   Should I do my daily Image-Streaming in bulk or can I split it into many sessions?

For purposes of improving your contact between inner and outer worlds, I lean toward the many shorter sessions, though one good deep long plunge once in awhile helps keep it interesting and non-routine.

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